YOUNG PROJECTS at MIT

I thought I’d take a break from writing about lecture’s, but last week’s presentation by Bryan Young of Young Projects has kept me thinking about fabrication, diagrams, and even Pac Man, so I couldn’t resist sharing some of his projects.
Gerken Loft; copyright Young Projects

Gerken Loft; copyright Young Projects

While the drawings, diagrams, and images were all inspiring, what made these projects stand out to me was seeing their custom, hand-crafted fabrication methods. In one project for an interior wall, Bryan employed a century-old pulled plaster techniques (traditionally used for making crown molding) to create a unique, undulating surface. In my Precedents in Critical Practice theory course, we’ve just finished a section on parametric design and scripting. For me, many of the projects emerging in this style are so driven by the complexities that can be achieved through parametric design but what’s often not discussed, or seen, are the fabrication methods, however complex or “simple”. Bryan stressed his use of parametric design to generate the necessary models and iterations but not to solve all fabrication or design problems. It was refreshing to see. What really drives the fabrication methods the projects Bryan presented were cost, local labor, ease of construction process, speed of production, and, using a material and method in an entirely new way.
Gerken Loft; copyright Architectural League of New York

Gerken Loft; copyright Architectural League of New York

Hudson St. Residence, copyright Allied Works Architecture

Hudson St. Residence, copyright Allied Works Architecture

Hudson St. Residence, copyright Allied Works Architecture

Hudson St. Residence, copyright Allied Works Architecture

His use of the pulled plaster technique reminded me silkscreen printing and the manual and physical process of exposing a screen and then pulling a print. I’m interested in researching and thinking more about how these sorts techniques can be applied to architecture and design.
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