WEATHER PROJECT REMIX: Marc Jacobs Fall / Winter 2013

Marc Jacobs is undoubtedly America’s most famous fashion designer. He is the creative director for his eponymous line as well as its budget cousin, Marc by Marc Jacobs, and for Paris-based Louis Vuitton. With four collections a year (Resort, Spring / Summer, Pre-Fall, Fall / Winter)  per line that’s a lot of designing. Jacobs is known for his encyclopedic knowledge of fashion and his uncanny ability to combine disparate references in unexpected ways that generate striking results (similar to Miuccia Prada, more on her in another post). Refreshingly Jacobs discusses his references openly in interviews.

For his most recent show Jacobs also re-appropriated a few ideas for the runway presentation: he used mono-frequency lamps to show the collection in sepia shades before showing it again with conventional lights in full color. In interviews, fashion editors said that it allowed them to appreciate the silhouette and texture of the clothes without the distraction of color. For his part Jacobs credited Hurricane Sandy for inspiring the show’s somber tone. Thankfully he also credited Olafur Eliasson.

You may remember that Eliasson used the same mono-frequency lamps for his Weather Project in 2003 in the Turbine Hall of  London’s Tate Modern. As architects I think we’re conditioned to think  that things like this are derivative, or potentially plagiarous, but I for one am happy to see a good idea used more than once for a different effect in a different context.

Olafur Eliasson’s Weather Project (2003-2004) at the Tate Modern in London

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